Assuming you have a finished and polished manuscript ready to be published, your first task is to create an ebook file; EPUB is the industry standard ebook format accepted by nearly all retailers. Unfortunately, this cannot be done through a simple Word export, but many tools and services will help you prep an EPUB file. (While most retailers and distributors try to offer good Word-to-ebook conversion, results and quality vary tremendously. Use them with caution.)
I personally use an eBook programmer for all my own books and all my client’s books. Outsourcing isn’t that expensive when it means you can avoid negative reviews on Amazon from people who can’t read a poorly formatted Kindle book. Negative reviews and a soiled reputation as an author are much harder to pay for in the long run than a proper eBook programmer, so if you have bullets, italics, bolds, headings, graphics or other complex formatting I’d recommend not skipping that crucial step.

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Verify your publishing rights. Public domain books are out of copyright. So, say you wanted to publish Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, you could publish it but it's likely that one of the official versions would sell better and it's available for free everywhere anyway. For your own books, select “This is not a public domain work and I hold the necessary publishing rights.”
It should have been split. The book has three sections — how to write for publications, copywriting, and blogging. Duh! I could have created a cool Make a Living Writing ebook series, strengthened my brand, and had more products to sell. It’s always better to have more products because then you can bundle them in different ways or offer them as freebies to incent people to buy other products. Also, splitting it up likely would have gotten the first one done faster and allowed me to start earning sooner.

Great, informative, and straight-to-the-point article Paul. Thanks! I’m gathering a lot of information about e-publishing on the Kindle platform on our ‘Write2Profit’ Writer’s Website, and this is really helpful. As a Kindle ‘newbie’ I’m also hoping to publish some e-Books on Kindle shortly, so again – thanks for a really useful and informative article. I’m off to get your free e-Book now, so thanks for that, too!
Free Read Feed (UK) has over 5,000 free ebook listings from Amazon (UK).  They monitor recent free offerings as well as showing some that are always free.  Like their USA counterpart below, the site offers sorting by genre, time offered, length and popularity.  This link is to the Children's Non-Fiction, Children's Fiction and Children and Teens genre listings.

Self-published authors have had big success in recent years. Take Hugh Howey, who sold a series of science fiction books through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. At one point, he was selling 20,000 — 30,000 copies a month, which generated $150,000 in income monthly. Amanda Hocking, who writes “paranormal romance” and fantasy novels, has sold well more than a million books on Amazon, generating over $2 million in sales. That's proof that you can make money self-publishing on Amazon.
There are certain platforms in the ebook market who identify themselves as ebook aggregators. An aggregator stands between the author and the retailer such as Amazon. As Brookes describes: “ebook aggregators are companies that take a file from the user, convert it into multiple formats and make it available through multiple distribution channels (platforms, stores, libraries).”
Scribd has long been the go-to spot for sharing text-based documents, but it’s been in the news recently for its new, subscription-based premium reader service (unlimited books for $8.99 a month). Now that the service has been monetized, e-books are available either to purchase separately (outside the subscription model) or via its subscription service and are available in both the Scribd store and Scribd apps with royalties at “80% of revenue.” Unlike with other publishers that require an e-pub file, authors can upload any file type (pdf, word doc, rtf) for free and make changes easily by uploading a new file —while still retaining the document’s statistics, comments, and URL. Scribd emphasizes its facilitation of discoverability with over 80 million monthly readers and a curated homepage of selected titles based on the subscriber’s interests. It also bills itself as a social publisher that supports comments on author’s work and allows embedding of documents in blogs and other websites. Authors must register for a free Scribd account. Authors control pricing and preview options and have access to “instant analytics.”

When a man from her past suddenly steals her heart, she is faced with the thrill of being truly desired for the first time, while possibly stumbling too quickly into a relationship where she might again mistake compatibility for love. She must reveal insecurities, face fears, and be honest with herself if she hopes to embrace life, love, and friendship with the two men she holds closest to her heart.

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